Coal House - Netflix

Tue 25 June 2019

Living history reality series set in Wales.

Coal House - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2007-10-19

Coal House - Coal mining - Netflix

Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, “colliery” generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States, “colliery” has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunnelling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, hydraulic jacks and shearers.

Coal House - Production - Netflix

Coal is mined commercially in over 50 countries. Over 7,036 Mt/yr of hard coal was produced in 2007, a substantial increase over the previous 25 years. In 2006, the world production of brown coal (lignite) was slightly over 1,000 Mt, with Germany the world’s largest brown coal producer at 194.4 Mt, and China second at 100.6 Mt. Coal production has grown fastest in Asia, while Europe has declined. Since 2013, the world coal production is decreasing, -6% in 2016. The top coal mining nations are: Most coal production is used in the country of origin, with around 16 percent of hard coal production being exported. Coal reserves are available in almost every country worldwide, with recoverable reserves in around 70 countries. At current production levels, proven coal reserves are estimated to last 147 years. However, production levels are by no means level, and are in fact increasing and some estimates are that peak coal could arrive in many countries such as China and America by around 2030. Coal reserves are usually stated as either (1) “Resources” (“measured” + “indicated” + “inferred” = “resources”, and then, a smaller number, often only 10-20% of “resources,” (2) “Run of Mine” (ROM) reserves, and finally (3) “marketable reserves”, which may be only 60% of ROM reserves. The standards for reserves are set by stock exchanges, in consultation with industry associations. For example, in ASEAN countries reserves standards follow the Australasian Joint Ore Reserves Committee Code (JORC) used by the Australian Securities Exchange.

Coal House - References - Netflix